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Archive for April, 2009

Depending on where radiation is directed, you may also experience hair loss on your legs, arms, underarms, pubic area, chest, eyelashes, and eyebrows, in addition to your head.

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Depending on the type of treatment you receive, hair loss may start anywhere from seven to 21 days after treatment begins. Your hair will start to grow back when you are finished with chemotherapy but it may take six to 12 months to grow back completely. It may even have a different texture – for example, curly hair can grow back straight and dark hair can become lighter. These changes are usually not permanent. Radiation to the head or scalp, however, can cause permanent hair loss.

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For many people, hair loss is one of the more trying aspects of cancer treatment. When hair falls out, it affects our self-image and our quality of life. But you don’t have to despair – you can go a long way towards boosting your own self-confidence with an educated attitude and some advance preparation.

Everyone’s experience is different, so it’s important to become well informed about how your particular treatment affects hair loss. Talk to your doctor, nurse, or social worker about what to expect.

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I am CANCER, hear me roar!
We are AWARE, hear us roar!!

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You know, this is everyones’ fight. Cancer is everybody’s enemy. It’s strong and has a simple philosophy: mutiply for the sake of multiplying.
We’re strong too, and we should and must do everything in our power to fight and defeat it.
You can help. Just here, in this one place, you can help by leaving your feedback.

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Breaking a finger.
Getting a tooth pulled.
Having your appendix burst.
Swimsuit shopping.
A bad haircut.
An argument with a friend.
Watching a loved one suffer.
Getting the flu.
A bad school report.
Falling down.
Getting an injury that requires both a doctor & a dentist.
Being burned.
Losing your front tooth.
Getting a cold.
Getting cancer.

You may add more if you’d like.

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How Can You Help?

How can you help?
Speak up on any occasion that demands it.
See your doctor as soon as possible if you have any symptoms.
Encourage others to see a doctor if any symptoms occur and to keep on seeing him until he orders the needed tests and/or procedures.
Be aware of any articles, updates on progress, tv, etc. about ovarian cancer.
Send them on.
Ask all your friends and family to visit this page.
Leave comments here and on the awareness page.

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